• Introduction To Marine Life Course: Whales, Dolphins & Porpoises

    This course gives students of all ages a wonderful introduction to the marine life of British Columbia. Building on the Aquarium’s successful research and education programs, the course will introduce participants to a variety of sea creatures found along the shores of B.C. Whales, Dolphins & Porpoises Tuesday, September 30, 2014 Dr. Lance Barrett-Lennard has a broad range of research experience in the field studies of marine mammals, with a particular focus on killer whales. He has been an active collaborator in the ongoing studies of the behavioural and population biology of killer whales in British Columbia and Alaska since 1984, and has also studied the species in Norway and the sub-Antarctic. Carla Crossman is an East Coast native and grew up around the water with a love of the oc...

    published: 01 Oct 2014
  • URI Graduate Student Studies Whale Snot

    A doctoral student in the URI Integrative and Evolutionary Biology Program, Justin Richard is working with Mystic Aquarium to learn whether he can determine a whale's gender, reproductive status and other information from the cells and hormones that they exhale. Help us caption & translate this video! http://amara.org/v/CCAI/

    published: 15 Feb 2013
  • Humpback whale disentangled off Provincetown by Center for Coastal Studies MAER team. 12/20/16.

    The MAER team was conducting a research cruise with the CCS Humpback Whale Studies Program on December 20 when they came across two young humpback whales feeding off Herring Cove, Provincetown. The whales were lunging through schools of sand lance (small fish often preyed upon by humpback whales) when one of the whales struck a buoy line marking fishing gear. The whale quickly drew the buoy beneath the surface. “When the whale resurfaced nearby it was rolling and thrashing, clearly upset. It happened shockingly fast” said Scott Landry, director of the MAER program. The whale began to tow the fishing gear north, out of the bay, at a speed of nearly 10 knots. The team also reacted quickly and threw a grappling hook into the gear being towed by the whale. With a sixty foot length of rope an...

    published: 21 Dec 2016
  • WHALE STUDIES // Watercolor Speedpainting

    Don't forget to like, comment and subscribe! Thank you for watching! I haven't made a video in a while so I'm a bit rusty. Hopefully I'll be posting more videos in the future! I'm back! Social Media: •Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/limjesssie DISCOUNTS & PROMO CODES FOR YOU LOVES Lyft: https://lyft.com/igi/ "JESSICA782787" referral code! EYEBUYDIRECT: https://www.eyebuydirect.com/2681477 "IFJHVZ9VX1" for $10 off your purchase. VIDEO: Filmed and Edited by Jessica Lim Liwag Edit: Adobe Premiere Pro CC 2017 Camera: Canon T3i MUSIC: epidemicsound.com

    published: 14 Jun 2017
  • Stranded Sperm Whale on Perran Beach (Perranporth) in Cornwall UK

    In July 2016 a 10.3m young female sperm whale was stranded on Perran Beach at Perranporth Cornwall in the United Kingdom. It had swum close to the beach at high tide and became stuck as the tide receded. According to data at The collaborative UK Cetacean Strandings Investigation Programme it is thought to be the first confirmed female sperm whale recorded in the UK in over 100 years. This is the official release from the Cetacean Strandings Investigation Programme- UK strandings after a two day post-mortem -- The sperm whale (national reference SW2016/340) which live stranded and died at Perranporth beach on Sunday was examined by the CSIP and by staff and volunteers from the Cornwall Wildlife Trust Marine Strandings Network/Exeter University over the course of Monday afternoon through int...

    published: 12 Jul 2016
  • Filming humpback whales off Ireland's south coast with Cork Whale Watch

    Colin Barnes of Cork Whale Watch is regularly asked to collaborate on both Irish and UK natural history productions. This extract is from "Living the Wildlife", Series II, episode 3, presented by Colin Stafford Johnson, and aired on RTE in 2009. To book your trip out with Colin Barnes off Ireland's South Coast visit the Cork Whale Watch Website on www.corkwhalewatch.com or join us on Facebook at www,facebook.com/corkwhalewatch. Filming was carried out using the MV Holly Jo along the Cork coast, extending into Co. Waterford. It was a long way from our home port in West Cork, but these are the lengths we have to be prepared to go to in order to capture the best film footage. This programme showcased the conservation research of the Irish Whale and Dolphin Group www.iwdg.ie which include...

    published: 06 Nov 2013
  • Dolphin/Whale Navy Training: "A Technical Film Report on Project Deep Ops" 1972 US Navy

    Whales & Dolphins playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL8653AB5185DCFFBF more at http://quickfound.net "This film report on Project Deep Ops provides an overview of a program to train orca and pilot whales to assist the US Navy in the retrieval of underwater objects. A pilot whale named Morgan is shown working with human trainers to carry out retrieval tasks." Morgan would dive as deep as 1,654 feet carrying US Navy hardware. The program is now called the U.S. Navy Marine Mammal Program (NMMP). Film # DA-LHM-72-4 produced for the US Naval Undersea Research & Development Center (Bio-Systems Division) at San Diego, California by Motion Picture Productions Audio-Visual Division. Public domain film from the US National Archives, slightly cropped to remove uneven edges, with th...

    published: 10 Jan 2017
  • Footprints On The Water: The Nan Hauser Story [Whale Documentary] | Wild Things

    Footprints on the Water follows the personal quest of Nan Hauser on her mission to unlock new clues to the behaviour of whales and dolphins. Despite the fact that whales and dolphins are such huge animals, much of their behaviour is still unrecorded. Nan Hauser has spent much of her adult life trying to track down and understand these remarkable creatures. Her groundbreaking work and dedication to whale conservation has shown that one individual can really make a difference. Nan's fascinating research journey spans two oceans and culminates with the establishment of the first whale sanctuary in the South Pacific. Along the way she swims with the great whales and studies one of the rarest mammals on the planet, the mysterious beaked whale. Click here for more documentaries: http://bit.l...

    published: 21 Jun 2017
  • Blue Whale Barrel Roll Caught On Camera

    Blue whales can grow to 90 feet -- that's longer than a tennis court. Getting that big requires a lot of fuel, says Jeremy Goldbogen, a postdoctoral researcher at the Cascadia Research Collective. That's why Goldbogen studies the whales' dining habits. They feed on krill, slurping in millions of the mini crustaceans along with hundreds of thousands of pounds of water in a single gulp. With the help of data tags and a National Geographic Crittercam, Goldbogen and colleagues found that blue whales do underwater acrobatics while they eat -- specifically a move they coined "the blue whale barrel roll."

    published: 07 Dec 2012
  • Surprising science: Unusual whale behavior captured on film | Conservation International (CI)

    Watch more whales: http://youtu.be/OVqBjn4W6gM Nan Hauser is a Conservation International Marine Fellow who works in the Bahamas. Her amazing, fascinating studies of whales helped spur the creation of the world's largest marine park. This 1.1 million-square-kilometer (425,000-square-mile) Cook Islands Marine Park will help protect the islands' tourism industry, which accounts for 70 percent of the national economy. And along the way, Nan has captured some of the most attention-grabbing footage of whales you've ever seen — like this clip. Are these whales chatting? Marking their territory? Maybe they're just happy. No matter the answer, it's footage like this that helps Nan make a massive difference, using her research to keep our oceans blue. Learn more about CI's work to protect the P...

    published: 27 Jun 2013
  • Whale Researcher Nan Hauser: Using Science to Inform Smart Policy | Conservation International (CI)

    Nan Hauser is a marine biologist and Conservation International Marine Fellow who works in the Cook Islands studying whales and dolphins. Her amazing, fascinating studies have generated some of the most eye-popping footage of whales you've ever seen — and they have also helped spur the creation of one of the largest protected areas on Earth. Nan is working with CI to develop the Cook Islands Marine Park. This 1.1 million-square-kilometer (425,000-square-mile) park, bigger than Alaska, will help protect the islands' tourism industry, which accounts for 70% of the national economy. And it will help keep a way of life alive for Cook Island residents, now and for generations to come. Nan's love, devotion and force of personality are all helping her make a massive difference, using her resear...

    published: 15 Aug 2013
  • Installation of skeleton of humpback whale Spinnaker at the Hiebert Marine Lab

    Conserved, articulated and installed by Whales and Nails. Special thanks to Dan, Courtney, Lindsey and Maddie for their hard work, engineering skills and artistry. Produced by Bob Lynch, member of the Center for Coastal Studies Marine Animal Entanglement Response team. More information about Spinnaker at http://bit.ly/2r7Kdnu

    published: 30 May 2017
  • Killer Whale Researchers Aboard

    For the last seven years NOAA researchers have sailed aboard the National Geographic Explorer to conduct their studies alongside Lindblad Expeditions-National Geographic guests. Video by Ross Weinberg.

    published: 28 Jun 2017
  • Why a Massive Whale Graveyard's in The Desert

    A prehistoric whale graveyard was discovered in a Chilean desert a few years ago, and no one could figure out how the whales all died together half a mile from the coast... until now. Anthony is here to tell you how something as small as algae might have killed dozens of whales at once. Read More: Repeated Mass Strandings of Miocene Marine Mammals From Atacama Region Of Chile Point To Sudden Death At Sea http://rspb.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/281/1781/20133316.ful%20l?sid48db7d99-30b0-4766-8daf-6c5de22c061e "Marine mammal mass strandings have occurred for millions of years, but their origins defy singular explanations." Cerro Ballena http://www.cerroballena.si.edu/ Scientists Have Solved The Mystery Of Why There's A Whale Graveyard In The Middle Of A Chilean Desert http://news.n...

    published: 06 Mar 2014
  • Underwater video of entangled humpback whale off Chatham, MA

    On July 6, 2016 the Marine Animal Entanglement Response (MAER) team from the Center for Coastal Studies (CCS) in Provincetown worked to help a badly entangled humpback whale off Cape Cod. The whale, which was towing heavy rope and a large buoy, was first reported by a commercial fisherman on Tuesday morning off Chatham, MA. USCG Station Chatham responded and stood by the whale as the CCS Marine Animal Entanglement Response team (MAER) made its way from Provincetown. The team was able to attach a tracking buoy to the entanglement before poor sea conditions cut short their efforts. However, the whale was tracked as it traveled south through the night, and by 9.30 am the following day the team was back working with the animal. The whale had five tight loops of heavy rope wrapped around and...

    published: 08 Jul 2016
  • Humpback Whale Footage: Disentanglement with Center for Coastal Studies

    Short clip of humpback whale disentanglement efforts by the Provincetown Center for Coastal Studies. Footage available for licensing at www.inthewildproductions.com. For footage licensing visit https://www.inthewildproductions.com.

    published: 09 Apr 2010
Introduction To Marine Life Course: Whales, Dolphins & Porpoises

Introduction To Marine Life Course: Whales, Dolphins & Porpoises

  • Order:
  • Duration: 2:25:37
  • Updated: 01 Oct 2014
  • views: 8949
videos
This course gives students of all ages a wonderful introduction to the marine life of British Columbia. Building on the Aquarium’s successful research and education programs, the course will introduce participants to a variety of sea creatures found along the shores of B.C. Whales, Dolphins & Porpoises Tuesday, September 30, 2014 Dr. Lance Barrett-Lennard has a broad range of research experience in the field studies of marine mammals, with a particular focus on killer whales. He has been an active collaborator in the ongoing studies of the behavioural and population biology of killer whales in British Columbia and Alaska since 1984, and has also studied the species in Norway and the sub-Antarctic. Carla Crossman is an East Coast native and grew up around the water with a love of the ocean and a passion for the protection of biodiversity through research and public outreach. She has an undergraduate degree in biology from Queen’s University and studied porpoises for her master’s degree at UBC. Carla currently is a marine mammal research biologist for the Vancouver Aquarium Cetacean Research Program. Tessa Danelesko was raised in Calgary, Alberta and fell in love with the ocean during summer vacations exploring the shores of Vancouver Island. She attended the University of Victoria and completed the Combined Biology and Psychology BSc program. She has experience working and volunteering for a variety of marine conservation and research projects that have taken her around the globe and she is currently the Coordinator for the B.C. Cetacean Sightings Network at the Vancouver Aquarium.
https://wn.com/Introduction_To_Marine_Life_Course_Whales,_Dolphins_Porpoises
URI Graduate Student Studies Whale Snot

URI Graduate Student Studies Whale Snot

  • Order:
  • Duration: 2:33
  • Updated: 15 Feb 2013
  • views: 2166
videos
A doctoral student in the URI Integrative and Evolutionary Biology Program, Justin Richard is working with Mystic Aquarium to learn whether he can determine a whale's gender, reproductive status and other information from the cells and hormones that they exhale. Help us caption & translate this video! http://amara.org/v/CCAI/
https://wn.com/Uri_Graduate_Student_Studies_Whale_Snot
Humpback whale disentangled off Provincetown by Center for Coastal Studies MAER team. 12/20/16.

Humpback whale disentangled off Provincetown by Center for Coastal Studies MAER team. 12/20/16.

  • Order:
  • Duration: 0:25
  • Updated: 21 Dec 2016
  • views: 953
videos
The MAER team was conducting a research cruise with the CCS Humpback Whale Studies Program on December 20 when they came across two young humpback whales feeding off Herring Cove, Provincetown. The whales were lunging through schools of sand lance (small fish often preyed upon by humpback whales) when one of the whales struck a buoy line marking fishing gear. The whale quickly drew the buoy beneath the surface. “When the whale resurfaced nearby it was rolling and thrashing, clearly upset. It happened shockingly fast” said Scott Landry, director of the MAER program. The whale began to tow the fishing gear north, out of the bay, at a speed of nearly 10 knots. The team also reacted quickly and threw a grappling hook into the gear being towed by the whale. With a sixty foot length of rope and a large float, the grapple marked the whale during dives and helped slow the whale. This gave the team time to ready disentanglement gear, including a small inflatable boat. During this process the whale went through bouts of high speed swimming, then slowing to swim in circles. An hour after becoming entangled the drag of the large float the team had attached to the entanglement helped the whale draw all of the entangling rope from its body, and it swam off.
https://wn.com/Humpback_Whale_Disentangled_Off_Provincetown_By_Center_For_Coastal_Studies_Maer_Team._12_20_16.
WHALE STUDIES // Watercolor Speedpainting

WHALE STUDIES // Watercolor Speedpainting

  • Order:
  • Duration: 1:58
  • Updated: 14 Jun 2017
  • views: 25
videos
Don't forget to like, comment and subscribe! Thank you for watching! I haven't made a video in a while so I'm a bit rusty. Hopefully I'll be posting more videos in the future! I'm back! Social Media: •Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/limjesssie DISCOUNTS & PROMO CODES FOR YOU LOVES Lyft: https://lyft.com/igi/ "JESSICA782787" referral code! EYEBUYDIRECT: https://www.eyebuydirect.com/2681477 "IFJHVZ9VX1" for $10 off your purchase. VIDEO: Filmed and Edited by Jessica Lim Liwag Edit: Adobe Premiere Pro CC 2017 Camera: Canon T3i MUSIC: epidemicsound.com
https://wn.com/Whale_Studies_Watercolor_Speedpainting
Stranded Sperm Whale on Perran Beach (Perranporth) in Cornwall UK

Stranded Sperm Whale on Perran Beach (Perranporth) in Cornwall UK

  • Order:
  • Duration: 0:54
  • Updated: 12 Jul 2016
  • views: 11871
videos
In July 2016 a 10.3m young female sperm whale was stranded on Perran Beach at Perranporth Cornwall in the United Kingdom. It had swum close to the beach at high tide and became stuck as the tide receded. According to data at The collaborative UK Cetacean Strandings Investigation Programme it is thought to be the first confirmed female sperm whale recorded in the UK in over 100 years. This is the official release from the Cetacean Strandings Investigation Programme- UK strandings after a two day post-mortem -- The sperm whale (national reference SW2016/340) which live stranded and died at Perranporth beach on Sunday was examined by the CSIP and by staff and volunteers from the Cornwall Wildlife Trust Marine Strandings Network/Exeter University over the course of Monday afternoon through into Tuesday morning. It was a 10.3m long adult female, which was judged to be in reasonable nutritional condition. The gastrointestinal tract was empty, with bile staining present through much of the intestinal tract, indicating a period of no feeding. Light burdens of nematode parasites and small quantities of squid beaks were also found in the stomachs, but no evidence of marine debris ingestion was noted. No gross evidence of significant disease was found, or any traumatic lesions consistent with ship strike or entanglement. Globally, segregation exists between male and female sperm whales, including in North Atlantic populations, with the matriarchal pods containing females normally resident in temperate to tropical waters much further south of the UK, whereas males generally travel in more temperate waters. We have historically only ever had juvenile/subadult male sperm whale strandings in the UK and this is the first confirmed female sperm whale to be recorded stranded in the UK, since routine collection of strandings data by the Natural History Museum began in 1913, illustrating the unusual nature of this stranding event. This was also only the sixth sperm whale to be recorded stranded in Cornwall in this same 100+ year period. The whale died from the pathophysiological effects of live stranding, but there's still a question of whether there was any underlying problem with it, which might explain why it stranded. We collected a large range of samples and specimens, which may help shed light on whether the whale was sick or compromised in some way and will also help further our understanding of a species which can be difficult to study. Samples for bacterial culture have been collected, along with a range of samples for further collaborative studies including histopathology, genetics, toxicology, virology, osteoblast (bone cell) culture, age/diet analysis and life history studies.
https://wn.com/Stranded_Sperm_Whale_On_Perran_Beach_(Perranporth)_In_Cornwall_UK
Filming humpback whales off Ireland's south coast with Cork Whale Watch

Filming humpback whales off Ireland's south coast with Cork Whale Watch

  • Order:
  • Duration: 3:51
  • Updated: 06 Nov 2013
  • views: 9427
videos
Colin Barnes of Cork Whale Watch is regularly asked to collaborate on both Irish and UK natural history productions. This extract is from "Living the Wildlife", Series II, episode 3, presented by Colin Stafford Johnson, and aired on RTE in 2009. To book your trip out with Colin Barnes off Ireland's South Coast visit the Cork Whale Watch Website on www.corkwhalewatch.com or join us on Facebook at www,facebook.com/corkwhalewatch. Filming was carried out using the MV Holly Jo along the Cork coast, extending into Co. Waterford. It was a long way from our home port in West Cork, but these are the lengths we have to be prepared to go to in order to capture the best film footage. This programme showcased the conservation research of the Irish Whale and Dolphin Group www.iwdg.ie which includes both Photo- Identification studies and acoustic monitoring of the humpback and fin whales along the Irish South coast.
https://wn.com/Filming_Humpback_Whales_Off_Ireland's_South_Coast_With_Cork_Whale_Watch
Dolphin/Whale Navy Training: "A Technical Film Report on Project Deep Ops" 1972 US Navy

Dolphin/Whale Navy Training: "A Technical Film Report on Project Deep Ops" 1972 US Navy

  • Order:
  • Duration: 14:30
  • Updated: 10 Jan 2017
  • views: 1292
videos
Whales & Dolphins playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL8653AB5185DCFFBF more at http://quickfound.net "This film report on Project Deep Ops provides an overview of a program to train orca and pilot whales to assist the US Navy in the retrieval of underwater objects. A pilot whale named Morgan is shown working with human trainers to carry out retrieval tasks." Morgan would dive as deep as 1,654 feet carrying US Navy hardware. The program is now called the U.S. Navy Marine Mammal Program (NMMP). Film # DA-LHM-72-4 produced for the US Naval Undersea Research & Development Center (Bio-Systems Division) at San Diego, California by Motion Picture Productions Audio-Visual Division. Public domain film from the US National Archives, slightly cropped to remove uneven edges, with the aspect ratio corrected, and one-pass brightness-contrast-color correction & mild video noise reduction applied. The soundtrack was also processed with volume normalization, noise reduction, clipping reduction, and/or equalization (the resulting sound, though not perfect, is far less noisy than the original). http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_Navy_Marine_Mammal_Program The U.S. Navy Marine Mammal Program (NMMP) is a program administered by the U.S. Navy which studies the military use of marine mammals - principally bottlenose dolphins and California sea lions - and trains animals to perform tasks such as ship and harbor protection, mine detection and clearance, and equipment recovery. The program is based in San Diego, California, where animals are housed and trained on an ongoing basis. NMMP animal teams have been deployed for use in combat zones, such as during the Vietnam War and the Iraq War. The program has been dogged by controversy over the treatment of the animals and speculation as to the nature of its mission and training. This has been due at least in part to the secrecy of the program, which was de-classified in the early 1990s. Since the program’s inception, there have been ongoing animal welfare concerns, with many opposing the use of marine mammals in military applications, even in essentially non-combatant roles such as mine detection. The Navy cites external oversight, including ongoing monitoring, in defense of its animal care standards. It has been reported that the program will come to a close beginning in 2017, when the mammals will be replaced by robotic mine-hunters such as the General Dynamics Knifefish... History The origins of the program date back to 1960, when a Pacific White-sided Dolphin was acquired for hydrodynamic studies seeking to improve torpedo performance... In 1962, the animals' intelligence, exceptional diving ability, and trainability led to the foundation of a new research program at Point Mugu, California, where a research facility was built on a sand spit between Mugu Lagoon and the ocean... A major accomplishment was the discovery that trained dolphins and sea lions could be reliably worked untethered in the open sea. In 1965, a Navy dolphin named Tuffy participated in the SEALAB II project off La Jolla, California, carrying tools and messages between the surface and the habitat 200 feet (60 m) below. Tuffy was also trained to locate and guide lost divers to safety. In 1967 the NMMP was classified and has since evolved into a major black budget program. The Point Mugu facility and its personnel were relocated to Point Loma in San Diego, and placed under the control of the Space and Naval Warfare Systems Center San Diego... The program The Navy Marine Mammal Program is based in San Diego, California, as part of SSC San Diego. The animals are trained in San Diego Bay; dolphin handlers can frequently be seen on the bay, where specialized small boats are used to transport dolphins between their pens and the training areas. Other locations are sometimes used for specific research, such as San Clemente Island in the Channel Islands of California, and torpedo test ranges in Seattle and Canada. The program's stated animal activities include protecting ports and Navy assets from swimmer attack, locating and assisting in the recovery of expensive exercise and training targets, and locating potentially dangerous sea mines. There are five marine mammal teams... These teams can be deployed at 72 hours' notice by ship, aircraft, helicopter, and land vehicle to regional conflicts or staging areas around the world... The Navy says that it has never trained its marine mammals for attack missions against people or ships. The Navy stated that since dolphins cannot discern the difference between enemy and friendly vessels, or divers and swimmers, this would be a haphazard means of warfare; instead, the animals are trained to detect all mines and swimmers in an area of concern, and to report back to their handlers, who then decide upon an appropriate response...
https://wn.com/Dolphin_Whale_Navy_Training_A_Technical_Film_Report_On_Project_Deep_Ops_1972_US_Navy
Footprints On The Water: The Nan Hauser Story [Whale Documentary] | Wild Things

Footprints On The Water: The Nan Hauser Story [Whale Documentary] | Wild Things

  • Order:
  • Duration: 49:31
  • Updated: 21 Jun 2017
  • views: 972
videos
Footprints on the Water follows the personal quest of Nan Hauser on her mission to unlock new clues to the behaviour of whales and dolphins. Despite the fact that whales and dolphins are such huge animals, much of their behaviour is still unrecorded. Nan Hauser has spent much of her adult life trying to track down and understand these remarkable creatures. Her groundbreaking work and dedication to whale conservation has shown that one individual can really make a difference. Nan's fascinating research journey spans two oceans and culminates with the establishment of the first whale sanctuary in the South Pacific. Along the way she swims with the great whales and studies one of the rarest mammals on the planet, the mysterious beaked whale. Click here for more documentaries: http://bit.ly/2gSPaf6 For exclusive clips, follow us Facebook: facebook.com/wildthingschannel Any queries, please contact us at: wildthings@littledotstudios.com Content licensed by Power Entertainment.
https://wn.com/Footprints_On_The_Water_The_Nan_Hauser_Story_Whale_Documentary_|_Wild_Things
Blue Whale Barrel Roll Caught On Camera

Blue Whale Barrel Roll Caught On Camera

  • Order:
  • Duration: 3:47
  • Updated: 07 Dec 2012
  • views: 34686
videos
Blue whales can grow to 90 feet -- that's longer than a tennis court. Getting that big requires a lot of fuel, says Jeremy Goldbogen, a postdoctoral researcher at the Cascadia Research Collective. That's why Goldbogen studies the whales' dining habits. They feed on krill, slurping in millions of the mini crustaceans along with hundreds of thousands of pounds of water in a single gulp. With the help of data tags and a National Geographic Crittercam, Goldbogen and colleagues found that blue whales do underwater acrobatics while they eat -- specifically a move they coined "the blue whale barrel roll."
https://wn.com/Blue_Whale_Barrel_Roll_Caught_On_Camera
Surprising science: Unusual whale behavior captured on film | Conservation International (CI)

Surprising science: Unusual whale behavior captured on film | Conservation International (CI)

  • Order:
  • Duration: 0:48
  • Updated: 27 Jun 2013
  • views: 3998
videos
Watch more whales: http://youtu.be/OVqBjn4W6gM Nan Hauser is a Conservation International Marine Fellow who works in the Bahamas. Her amazing, fascinating studies of whales helped spur the creation of the world's largest marine park. This 1.1 million-square-kilometer (425,000-square-mile) Cook Islands Marine Park will help protect the islands' tourism industry, which accounts for 70 percent of the national economy. And along the way, Nan has captured some of the most attention-grabbing footage of whales you've ever seen — like this clip. Are these whales chatting? Marking their territory? Maybe they're just happy. No matter the answer, it's footage like this that helps Nan make a massive difference, using her research to keep our oceans blue. Learn more about CI's work to protect the Pacific Ocean: http://www.Conservation.org/PacificOceanscape
https://wn.com/Surprising_Science_Unusual_Whale_Behavior_Captured_On_Film_|_Conservation_International_(Ci)
Whale Researcher Nan Hauser: Using Science to Inform Smart Policy | Conservation International (CI)

Whale Researcher Nan Hauser: Using Science to Inform Smart Policy | Conservation International (CI)

  • Order:
  • Duration: 5:33
  • Updated: 15 Aug 2013
  • views: 3216
videos
Nan Hauser is a marine biologist and Conservation International Marine Fellow who works in the Cook Islands studying whales and dolphins. Her amazing, fascinating studies have generated some of the most eye-popping footage of whales you've ever seen — and they have also helped spur the creation of one of the largest protected areas on Earth. Nan is working with CI to develop the Cook Islands Marine Park. This 1.1 million-square-kilometer (425,000-square-mile) park, bigger than Alaska, will help protect the islands' tourism industry, which accounts for 70% of the national economy. And it will help keep a way of life alive for Cook Island residents, now and for generations to come. Nan's love, devotion and force of personality are all helping her make a massive difference, using her research to keep our oceans blue. | Related video: Meet Kevin Iro, Rugby Player and Ocean Advocate in the Cook Islands http://youtu.be/QTW6POwGtXs Follow CI on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/ConservationOrg Follow CI on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/conservation.intl
https://wn.com/Whale_Researcher_Nan_Hauser_Using_Science_To_Inform_Smart_Policy_|_Conservation_International_(Ci)
Installation of skeleton of humpback whale Spinnaker at the Hiebert Marine Lab

Installation of skeleton of humpback whale Spinnaker at the Hiebert Marine Lab

  • Order:
  • Duration: 2:40
  • Updated: 30 May 2017
  • views: 172
videos
Conserved, articulated and installed by Whales and Nails. Special thanks to Dan, Courtney, Lindsey and Maddie for their hard work, engineering skills and artistry. Produced by Bob Lynch, member of the Center for Coastal Studies Marine Animal Entanglement Response team. More information about Spinnaker at http://bit.ly/2r7Kdnu
https://wn.com/Installation_Of_Skeleton_Of_Humpback_Whale_Spinnaker_At_The_Hiebert_Marine_Lab
Killer Whale Researchers Aboard

Killer Whale Researchers Aboard

  • Order:
  • Duration: 2:14
  • Updated: 28 Jun 2017
  • views: 34
videos
For the last seven years NOAA researchers have sailed aboard the National Geographic Explorer to conduct their studies alongside Lindblad Expeditions-National Geographic guests. Video by Ross Weinberg.
https://wn.com/Killer_Whale_Researchers_Aboard
Why a Massive Whale Graveyard's in The Desert

Why a Massive Whale Graveyard's in The Desert

  • Order:
  • Duration: 3:07
  • Updated: 06 Mar 2014
  • views: 138237
videos
A prehistoric whale graveyard was discovered in a Chilean desert a few years ago, and no one could figure out how the whales all died together half a mile from the coast... until now. Anthony is here to tell you how something as small as algae might have killed dozens of whales at once. Read More: Repeated Mass Strandings of Miocene Marine Mammals From Atacama Region Of Chile Point To Sudden Death At Sea http://rspb.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/281/1781/20133316.ful%20l?sid48db7d99-30b0-4766-8daf-6c5de22c061e "Marine mammal mass strandings have occurred for millions of years, but their origins defy singular explanations." Cerro Ballena http://www.cerroballena.si.edu/ Scientists Have Solved The Mystery Of Why There's A Whale Graveyard In The Middle Of A Chilean Desert http://news.nationalpost.com/2014/02/27/scientists-have-solved-the-mystery-of-why-theres-a-whale-graveyard-in-the-middle-of-a-chilean-desert/ "Scientists investigating a graveyard of marine mammal fossils near Chile's northern coast say toxins generated by algae blooms most likely poisoned the animals millions of years ago." Chile's Stunning Fossil Whale Graveyard Explained http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-2634389 "It is one of the most astonishing fossil discoveries of recent years - a graveyard of whales found beside the Pan-American Highway in Chile." Killers Were tiny, Victims Were Huge At Chile's Whale Graveyard http://www.npr.org/blogs/thetwo-way/2014/02/26/282872803/killers-were-tiny-victims-were-huge-at-chiles-whale-graveyard "Since construction workers discovered dozens of fossils along a highway in Chile in 2011, one question has preoccupied researchers: What killed the whales, seals and other creatures that ended up there more than 5 million years ago?" Chilean Highway Project Unearths Amazing Graveyard Of Fossilized Whale Skeletons http://www.washingtonpost.com/national/health-science/new-report-studies-amazing-graveyard-of-fossilized-whale-skeletons-unearthed-in-chile/2014/02/25/51840df8-9e41-11e3-9ba6-800d1192d08b_story.html "The whales were found more than 120 feet above sea level, about two-thirds of a mile from the ocean, in ancient sandstones below what is now the northbound lane of the Pan-American Highway in the Atacama region of northern Chile." Pictures: Prehistoric Whale "Graveyard" Found in Desert http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2011/12/pictures/111206-whale-graveyard-chile-fossils-science/ "Scientists preserve a prehistoric adult whale skeleton's rib cage and tail in plaster in Chile's Atacama Desert in 2010." "Dead zone" is a More Common Term for Hypoxia, Which Refers to a Reduced Level of Oxygen in the Water http://oceanservice.noaa.gov/facts/deadzone.html "Less oxygen dissolved in the water is often referred to as a 'dead zone' because most marine life either dies, or, if they are mobile such as fish, leave the area." Dead Zone (Ecology) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dead_zone_(ecology) Eutrophication http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eutrophication Mudflat http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mudflat Watch More: Whales Get Sunburned https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=czC2DTvPIIM TestTube Wild Card http://testtube.com/dnews/dnews-476-allergies?utm_campaign=DNWC&utm_medium=DNews&utm_source=YT How Captivity Affects Orcas https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HRGu5H69p3s ____________________ DNews is dedicated to satisfying your curiosity and to bringing you mind-bending stories & perspectives you won't find anywhere else! New videos twice daily. Watch More DNews on TestTube http://testtube.com/dnews Subscribe now! http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=dnewschannel DNews on Twitter http://twitter.com/dnews Anthony Carboni on Twitter http://twitter.com/acarboni Laci Green on Twitter http://twitter.com/gogreen18 Trace Dominguez on Twitter http://twitter.com/trace501 DNews on Facebook https://facebook.com/DiscoveryNews DNews on Google+ http://gplus.to/dnews Discovery News http://discoverynews.com
https://wn.com/Why_A_Massive_Whale_Graveyard's_In_The_Desert
Underwater video of entangled humpback whale off Chatham, MA

Underwater video of entangled humpback whale off Chatham, MA

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  • Duration: 1:04
  • Updated: 08 Jul 2016
  • views: 443
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On July 6, 2016 the Marine Animal Entanglement Response (MAER) team from the Center for Coastal Studies (CCS) in Provincetown worked to help a badly entangled humpback whale off Cape Cod. The whale, which was towing heavy rope and a large buoy, was first reported by a commercial fisherman on Tuesday morning off Chatham, MA. USCG Station Chatham responded and stood by the whale as the CCS Marine Animal Entanglement Response team (MAER) made its way from Provincetown. The team was able to attach a tracking buoy to the entanglement before poor sea conditions cut short their efforts. However, the whale was tracked as it traveled south through the night, and by 9.30 am the following day the team was back working with the animal. The whale had five tight loops of heavy rope wrapped around and embedded within the base of its tail, cutting off the flow of blood to the flukes. As a result, the flukes had turned entirely white and floppy, and had become useless for swimming; the whale was making way by dog paddling with its right and left flippers. The team added a series of buoys to the entanglement to slow the whale and keep it at the surface. Using very sharp knives on long poles they were able to cut away most of the rope, but left some line around the wound that may act as a temporary tourniquet to prevent against massive blood loss. This rope should unwind and be rejected over time. While the overall condition of the young whale appeared surprisingly good – it was active, responsive and not emaciated – its long term prognosis is likely very poor, as it’s possible it may lose its flukes entirely. The Center for Coastal Studies is grateful to the commercial fisherman for reporting and standing by this whale, and to the USCG for their help in this case. Boaters are urged to report any entanglement sightings of whales, sea-turtles and other marine animals to the Marine Animal Entanglement Response Hotline (1-800-900-3622) or the US Coast Guard on VHF 16, and to stand by the animal at a safe distance until trained responders arrive. CCS disentanglement work is supported by a grant from the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) and the Massachusetts Division of Marine Fisheries (MA-DMF). Support for the Marine Animal Response Team also comes from grants from the Massachusetts Environmental Trust, the Pegasus Foundation, the Hermann Foundation, the Mary P. Dolciani Halloran Foundation, and contributions from CCS members. All disentanglement activities are conducted under a federal permit authorized by NOAA.
https://wn.com/Underwater_Video_Of_Entangled_Humpback_Whale_Off_Chatham,_Ma
Humpback Whale Footage: Disentanglement with Center for Coastal Studies

Humpback Whale Footage: Disentanglement with Center for Coastal Studies

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  • Duration: 0:37
  • Updated: 09 Apr 2010
  • views: 933
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Short clip of humpback whale disentanglement efforts by the Provincetown Center for Coastal Studies. Footage available for licensing at www.inthewildproductions.com. For footage licensing visit https://www.inthewildproductions.com.
https://wn.com/Humpback_Whale_Footage_Disentanglement_With_Center_For_Coastal_Studies
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